Linux Outlaws 273 – Our Man at NASA

Uncut video version of this episode on YouTube

0:02:41 INTRODUCTION

0:12:18 RELEASES & NEWS

BundesGit logo

1:19:14 MICROWATCH

1:23:22 FEEDBACK

Supporters: David Guest and James McBride — from Flattr: Dave Ostroske, viis, marmai, johanv, Duncan Eastoe, Bernd Schlapsi, corenominal, Mattias Ohlsson, Tony Jones, Mhondoz and David Green

  • Our Man at NASA updates on the Curiosity lander and also chimes in on keyboards

Song: Change (Live Acoustic) by 20lb Sounds (licensed Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0)

4 Responses to “Linux Outlaws 273 – Our Man at NASA”

  1. Sigg3

    I heard you talk about the so-called “desktop fragmentation” vs choice in this episode, and I thought I’d chime in.

    In my opinion there is no desktop fragmentation, there is only desktop variation. Think of it in terms of random mutation in evolution. The best fit survives. Thus, the greater variation the stronger the base.

    In the short run we may have some duplicated effort, but in time it will sort itself out.

    I personally use Gnome3, KDE, openbox and Xfce on my boxes. The only DE I can’t stand is Unity. If I could disable lenses it would be a lot better. But then it would probably be Gnome 3:)

  2. Mike Allen

    Re: tracking changes in German law

    Dear Fab

    While this is a useful concept, it would only work in a civil law country like Germany, France, China, (and most of the world), it would not be easy to do in a common law country like England. Common law countries don’t have codes, with law numbers, and paragraph numbers that get altered as new laws are passed. Instead they bring in a new act, with a name (often misleading). eg “The Prevention of child pornography on the internet Act, 2012” could be about anything – eg preventing Germans getting internet access in GB without 20 years residence in that country. The name of the act is like a headline in one of their tabloid newspapers – no more. Also many laws are made and changed by the courts in England (case law). It could not be done by a “diff” program. It would require hundreds of legal experts to go through each act meticulously. The common law system is a real dogs dinner…

    ciao

    Mike

  3. fabsh

    Another reason why I prefer civil law. Very good point.

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